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September 1923

THE FACTOR OF DETERIORATION IN CHILDREN SHOWING BEHAVIOR DIFFICULTIES AFTER EPIDEMIC ENCEPHALITIS

Arch NeurPsych. 1923;10(3):329-343. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1923.02190270064007
Abstract

The twenty patients on which this study is based were referred to the Institute for Juvenile Research by physicians, school authorities, or parents, chiefly because of incorrigibility, poor memory, or deterioration of general intelligence. Physical, psychologic and psychiatric examinations were made in each case with special emphasis on the psychologic factors involved. Preceding the attack of encephalitis, behavior difficulties were either absent or of little significance in each case. The first examinations were made two months to three and one-half years after the attack of epidemic encephalitis, the average being twenty-two months. The second examinations were made two to twenty-one months after the first, the average being six months; the third, an average of eleven months after the first examination.

In the literature on epidemic encephalitis in children, most writers conclude that when mental changes occur after the disease they consist of one or more of the following: (1) deterioration

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