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November 1923

CENTRAL PAIN IN SYRINGOMYELIA AND DYSESTHESIA AND OVERREACTION TO SENSORY STIMULI IN LESIONS BELOW THE OPTIC THALAMUS

Author Affiliations

Professor of Neurology in the University of Pennsylvania PHILADELPHIA

From the Philadelphia General Hospital and the Neurological Laboratory of the University of Pennsylvania.

Arch NeurPsych. 1923;10(5):491-499. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1923.02190290002001
Abstract

Pain has been frequently observed in syringomyelia and has been attributed to implication of posterior roots, as by meningitis. This explanation is satisfactory for some cases but not for all, and some other explanation for some of these cases must be found.

Oppenheim1 has not much to say about pain in syringomyelia. He remarks that pain is not uncommon and that French writers (Raymond and Lhermitte) describe a special form of syringomyelia characterized by intense pain. The cause of this pain he does not mention.

H. Schlesinger2 mentions that pain may be intense, so great as to take away all joy of life. He has observed severe pain especially in cases in which later disturbances in the motor and trophic functions developed. The pain may be boring, tearing, may simulate chronic rheumatism, or may be lancinating as in tabes. In one of his cases with pain, tabes also

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