[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other
November 1923

VISUAL HALLUCINATIONS AS A CEREBRAL LOCALIZING PHENOMENON: WITH ESPECIAL REFERENCE TO THEIR OCCURRENCE IN TUMORS OF THE TEMPORAL LOBES

Arch NeurPsych. 1923;10(5):532-547. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1923.02190290043005
Abstract

Visual hallucinatory phenomena in cases of definitely authenticated organic disease of the brain were recorded as early as 1879 when Westphal1 cited such an instance and gave the clinical and necropsy findings. His case was in a man, aged 42, who suffered from focal epilepsy involving the left side. Before death he had developed a left hemiplegia and left homonymous hemianopia. His hallucinations consisted in seeing not only bright colors before his eyes, but on one occasion the appearance of "a sword hovering over his head, about to drop on him." At this time "he stared up at the ceiling as if he saw something horrible there." Postmortem, there was found "atrophy and softening of the posterior half of the right hemisphere."

Since this early reference, numerous instances not only of color phenomena, but also of the apparent seeing of figures and objects by patients who later were shown

×