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January 1924

STUDIES OF THE METABOLISM IN EPILEPSY: I. THE NONPROTEIN NITROGENOUS CONSTITUENTS OF THE BLOOD

Arch NeurPsych. 1924;11(1):54-63. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1924.02190310060004
Abstract

Many physicians believe that defects of protein metabolism are of etiologic importance in epilepsy. This belief finds expression in the low protein diet which these clinicians prescribe for epileptic patients. The basis of such a belief is partly the result of therapeutic test and partly the result of laboratory experiment. Many writers have reported the beneficial effect of low protein, or of purin-free diets, though this favorable testimony is not unanimous. Cuneo,1 for example, states that improvement is more marked with a high protein than with a carbohydrate diet. Weeks2 et al. find no relation between diet and convulsions. The experimental evidence for faulty protein metabolism is found in the work of numerous investigators, mostly French, English and German, who have reported variations in the amounts of urinary uric acid, urea, ammonia or total nitrogen in the periods preceding or following convulsions. An analysis of these published data

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