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February 1924

BRAIN CHANGES IN TYPHUS FEVER CONTRASTED WITH THOSE IN EPIDEMIC ENCEPHALITIS AND ACUTE POLIOMYELITIS

Author Affiliations

Associate Professor of Neurology, College of Medicine, University of Illinois

From the Division of Neurology of the College of Medicine of the University of Illinois and the Pathology Laboratories of the Illinois State Psychopathic Institute and Cook County Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1924;11(2):121-136. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1924.02190320015003
Abstract

Recent pathologic studies of typhus fever, especially by German and Russian workers, have shown that in this disease the nervous system is not only involved with remarkable constancy, but is even involved more than any other part of the body. Because of the rarity of typhus in this country, American contributions on its pathology in general and that of the nervous system in particular are lacking. To Dr. J. Tarassewitz of Moscow, Russia, I am indebted for the brain of one case, and to Dr. E. K. Piette of Kharkov, Russia, for a number of paraffin blocks from two cases of typhus fever. In addition, I had the opportunity, during my stay in Russia last year, to study a number of stained sections and to secure a number of valuable contributions in the Russian language.1

As the brain changes in typhus fever are those of an acute encephalitis, it

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