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March 1924

INCREASED CRANIAL VASCULARITY IN ITS RELATION TO INTRACRANIAL DISEASE: WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO ENLARGEMENT OF THE VEINS OF THE DIPLOE AND ITS RELATION TO THE ENDOTHELIOMAS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the clinics and the roentgen-ray department of the New York Neurological Institute.

Arch NeurPsych. 1924;11(3):292-307. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1924.02190330042004
Abstract

Roentgenograms of the skull present many variations in the size and number of the vascular markings. The venous sinuses, the meningeal vessels and the veins of the diploe may all be visible as more or less distinct dark lines, and needless to say, the better the roentgenogram the clearer the vascular markings are visible. When the calvarium is thin—and this is a point worth noting—the normal vascular channels will often be seen so much better than when the skull is thick, that they may be mistaken for enlargements.

The grooves due to the large venous sinuses—especially in thin skulls and in those of children—are often very shallow and not clearly defined in the radiogram, but when the markings of the superior longitudinal and of the lateral sinuses are distinct, they are easily recognized from their location and size.

The grooves for the meningeal vessels are frequently visible as fine branching

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