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March 1924

OPTIC NEURITIS AND CHOKED DISK IN INFLUENZA

Arch NeurPsych. 1924;11(3):328-333. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1924.02190330078007
Abstract

That inflammation of the optic nerve may be associated with influenza is definitely shown by the literature. But whether the optic neuritis is infectious, toxic or mechanical is uncertain. In the case here reported, apparently there was an acute hydrocephalus and one might conclude that the optic neuritis was due to increase of intracranial pressure, but it seems much more probable that the optic neuritis was a local acute inflammatory reaction to a toxemia which also produced the hydrocephalus and perhaps a more general low-grade encephalitis.

REPORT OF CASE  In September, 1918, influenza was widespread in Boston. L. F., a Jewess, aged 29, was taken acutely ill on September 14, with headache, malaise, chills and fever. The fever was never over 102 F., and lasted only four or five days, but there was marked prostration and she was still in bed at the end of two weeks when seen by

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