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April 1924

A THEORY OF THE MECHANISM UNDERLYING INHIBITION IN THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM

Arch NeurPsych. 1924;11(4):418-431. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1924.02190340040004
Abstract

EXCITATION AND INHIBITION IN THE NERVOUS SYSTEM  In the various manifestations of the nervous system there are evidences of two distinct and mutually antagonistic processes, called excitation and inhibition. This dual function is represented in both the vegetative and cerebrospinal systems. It is evident in the lowest automatic activities of glands and viscera, as well as in the highest manifestations of the psychic sphere. And it may be stated as a general law that all neural function, irrespective of character or origin, is susceptible of increase or excitation and of decrease or inhibition.In the vegetative nervous system, which represents the lowest functional level of the neural mechanism, the researches of Gaskell1 and Langley2 have demonstrated the presence of both excitatory and inhibitory nerves. According to Gaskell, inhibitory nerves are separate from motor or excitor nerves, and the process of inhibition differs essentially in its nature from that

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