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May 1924

PARTIAL CONTINUOUS EPILEPSY WITH ESPECIAL REFERENCE TO THAT PRODUCED BY MICROSCOPIC CORTICAL LESIONS

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Neurological Department of the School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, from the Episcopal Hospital, Philadelphia, and from the Neurological Service and Laboratory of the Philadelphia General Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1924;11(5):530-542. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1924.02190350036002
Abstract

Kojewnikoff,1 Orlowski2 and Choroschko3 have described cases of epilepsy in which, during intervals between the general attacks, continuous muscular twitchings appeared at different places while consciousness was not affected. To this condition Kojewnikoff gave the name of epilepsia partialis continua. He said that the cause of such a condition might be tumor, abscess, syphilis, edema, embolism or a localized encephalitis. In his case he concluded it was localized encephalitis with sclerosis. This conclusion was reached without necropsy findings. Since the original description by Kojewnikoff and the articles mentioned above, partial continuous epilepsy has been discussed by Spiller,4 Burr5 and others. Spielmeyer6 and Mills7 have reported cases in which, from their descriptions, partial continuous epilepsy may have been present, although the cases were cited under the title of jacksonian epilepsy.

Spielmeyer reported instances of jacksonian epilepsy arising in cases of encephalitis in the motor

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