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June 1924

THE RELATION BETWEEN INFANTILE CONVULSIONS AND THE CHRONIC CONVULSIVE DISORDERS OF LATER LIFE

Author Affiliations

Instructor in Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Director of the Division of Mental Hygiene and Habit Clinics

Arch NeurPsych. 1924;11(6):664-668. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1924.02190360052003
Abstract

This report is the initial step in what is to be an extended study. The problem is to determine not only the relation between infantile convulsions and the chronic convulsive disorders of later life, but also to ascertain which type of convulsions may be considered malignant and which, if any, may be called benign. The attitude of the general practitioner and even of the pediatrician, toward infantile convulsions, is familiar. The convulsions ordinarily are minimized, even to the extent of being reduced in importance to that of a rise in temperature.

In a group of 300 cases taken at random at the Monson State Hospital for Epileptics, in which the information was sufficiently detailed and authenticated to be thought worthy of consideration, 150 patients had their first convulsion prior to the fourth year. I am not sure that this percentage is not a bit high, and that a larger group

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