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August 1924

LOCULATED MENINGITIS: WITH THE SYNDROME OF FROIN IN THE SPINAL FLUID

Arch NeurPsych. 1924;12(2):173-186. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1924.02200020044005
Abstract

The occurrence of fibrinogen in the spinal fluid of patients with acute meningitis was observed toward the end of the last century. In 1903, Lépine1 noted the formation of a coagulum in spinal fluid from a patient whose case was diagnosed as spinal rheumatism. During the same year Froin2 reported three cases in which he had observed the spinal fluid changes which as a syndrome have since borne his name. The syndrome of Froin consists of a yellowish or xanthochromatic spinal fluid with increased globulin and albumin, and showing the property of spontaneous coagulation. The coagulum usually forms within one-half hour after the withdrawal of the fluid. Frequently a pleocytosis is present in the fluid. In 1910, Nonne3 called attention to the increased globulin occurring in the spinal fluid of patients with spinal cord tumors. Many variations of these pathologic conditions are found in spinal fluids. The

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