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September 1924

TUMOR OF THE HYPOPHYSIS: REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Neurological Clinic and Neuro-Pathological Labcratory of the Philadelphia General Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1924;12(3):277-287. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1924.02200030030002
Abstract

It is noteworthy that tumors of the hypophysis do not always cause symptoms that are purely hypophysial. In other words, regions of the brain may be involved that are more or less remote from the hypophysis; such, for instance, as the pons and cerebellum. This, of course, is to be explained by the varying size and position of such growths, and a confusing picture may result which causes difficulty in the diagnosis. But the converse may also be true; for an extensive hypophysial growth may invade rather remote regions and yet not cause such corresponding symptoms as might be expected. The case here reported is of the latter kind. The growth was very large and involved the interpeduncular space, the cerebellopontile angle, the pons and the cerebellum; yet the symptoms were mainly those that are now recognized as hypophysial. Such a case may lead to unexpected difficulties in the surgical

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