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October 1924

NEUROPSYCHIATRIC SEQUELAE OF CEREBRAL TRAUMA IN CHILDREN

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Neuropsychiatric Clinics of the Pennsylvania and Philadelphia General Hospitals.

Arch NeurPsych. 1924;12(4):443-453. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1924.02200040092006
Abstract

In reviewing the literature on head injuries, we were struck by the attention devoted to the acute manifestations of cerebral trauma1 and the rarity of observations concerning the late complications. The serious deferred results of head injury in adults, as discussed by Michael,2 are even more pronounced in children. Here they attain vital clinical and social significance, since the physical, neurologic, psychiatric, and psychologic findings bear a close relation to school progress, delinquency, criminality and future adjustability in general. During the past year, thirty children with histories of previous head injury have been referred to us. There were included twenty-three boys and seven girls, ranging in age from 3 to 16. The intervals between the date of head injury and time of first examination were: in seven, four months to one year; in four, one to two years; in seven, two to five years; in seven, five to

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