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November 1924

THE SURGICAL TREATMENT OF GLOSSOPHARYNGEAL NEURALGIA

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.

From the Section on Neurologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic,

Arch NeurPsych. 1924;12(5):487-506. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1924.02200050002001
Abstract

Glossopharyngeal neuralgia is a disease similar to trifacial neuralgia in that the pains associated with it are spasmodic, excruciating and lancinating, but radiate from the pharynx and tonsillar fossa to the ear. The pain is brought on by swallowing or yawning, and lasts for only a few moments; the intermittent periods of pain and ease may continue for from a few weeks to several months, but always recur. Glossopharyngeal neuralgia simulates trifacial neuralgia, temporary relief being obtained by peripheral avulsion. In all probability the disease involves the superior jugular ganglion of the glossopharyngeal nerve, and while it may be possible occasionally to avulse both the petrosal and the jugular ganglion from an extracranial approach, the only assurance of permanent relief lies in division of the glossopharyngeal nerve proximal to the superior ganglion, through an intracranial approach.

ANATOMY  The ninth or glossopharyngeal nerve is a mixed nerve, containing motor and

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