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December 1924

MUCIN-LIKE BODIES IN THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM IN EPIDEMIC ENCEPHALITIS

Author Affiliations

PARIS; NEW YORK AND FRANCIS BERTILLON Assistant at the Hospital Paul Brousse (Villejuif) PARIS

From the laboratory of neuropathology of the University of Paris.

Arch NeurPsych. 1924;12(6):620-624. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1924.02200060021002
Abstract

Few references to the presence of mucin or mucin-like bodies in the central nervous system have been found. Grynfeldt1 has recently described mucin deposits in the brains in cases of epidemic encephalitis, Wilson's disease, parkinsonian syndromes, anemias and typhoid fever. The neuropathologic texts of Spielmeyer,2 Buzzard and Greenfield,3 and Bertrand4 make no comment on this subject.

The staining qualities of mucin are well known. Lee5 makes the general statement, quoting Hoyer, that "the mucin of mucus cells and goblet cells stain with basic tar dyes and with alum haematoxylin, but not with acid tar dyes." Lee makes no mention of the presence of mucin in the nervous system. Langeron6 states, in discussing mucin, that it is stained red with thionin, methyl violet, toluidin blue and polychrome blue. Both Langeron and Lee state that Mayer's mucicarmin mixture is specific for mucin. This mixture will also

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