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December 1924

SENSORY DISTURBANCES IN MULTIPLE SCLEROSISWITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE OCCURRENCE OF LEVEL LESIONS AND THEIR DIFFERENTIATION FROM THOSE OF INTRAVERTEBRAL TUMORS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Neurologic Service of the Mount Sinai Hospital, New York City.

Arch NeurPsych. 1924;12(6):682-694. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1924.02200060083006

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Abstract

The first reference in neurologic literature to the occurrence of disturbances of sensation in multiple sclerosis is found in the report of a case of this disease by Cruveilhier. The latter, writing in 1835, describes a case which he calls "induration of the cord with paraplegia," and states that he found "in places the sensibility diminished and delayed." Since then numerous observers have reported sensory disturbances in multiple sclerosis, so that their occurrence in this disease is now a generally admitted fact. Some writers have even gone so far as to state, and correctly so, that subjective sensory disturbances are among the most characteristic of the early signs of the disease. Objective sensory disturbances, on the other hand, have not been given the attention they deserve in the symptomatology and differential diagnosis. Most textbooks mention the presence of objective sensory disturbances, and dismiss the subject with a trite statement that

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