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January 1925

TRYPARSAMIDE IN SYPHILIS OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM: PRELIMINARY REPORT

Arch NeurPsych. 1925;13(1):80-85. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1925.02200070083006
Abstract

A brief account of the use of tryparsamide in the neurologic service at the Barnes Hospital may be of use in helping to appreciate at their proper value the reports of other clinicians. Chemically, tryparsamide is derived from atoxyl, which was one of the combinations in the arsenical series finally leading up to arsphenamin. It is a pentavalent arsenical. It was found to be effective in the treatment of experimental syphilis and trypanosomiasis, but it was discarded as far as human syphilis was concerned on account of the directly detrimental effect on the optic nerve. There is therefore little to be learned from the early use of atoxyl, except reports dealing with high percentages of visual complications. The same was true of the next pentavalent arsenical—arsacetin.

Working with these two drugs, Jacobs and Heidelberger, in 1905, made a substance, N-phenylglycinamide-p-arsonic acid, which was biologically studied by Wade Brown and

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