[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other
January 1925

RESULTS OF ADMINISTRATION OF TRYPARSAMIDE IN SYPHILITIC DISEASE OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM AND IN CERTAIN OTHER DISEASES OF A NONSYPHILITIC CHARACTER

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Neurological Department of the Bellevue Hospital, New York.

Arch NeurPsych. 1925;13(1):86-95. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1925.02200070089007
Abstract

Tryparsamide is the sodium salt of N-phenyl-glycineamid-p-arsonic-acid. It was first made in 1915 by Jacobs and Heidelberger, and since that date has been extensively experimented with by Brown and Pearce, who have established its biologic actions in normal animals and in animals infected with trypanosomes and with the spirochetes of relapsing fever and of syphilis. Reports from subsequent investigators deal with the use of the drug in the treatment of patients with syphilis of the central nervous system (Pearce, Keidel, Moore and Lorenz, Löwenhart, Bleckwein and Hodges). More recently, a report by Kirby discusses the value of the drug particularly in the treatment of the patient with general paralysis.

In the summer of 1923, in the neurological department of Bellevue Hospital, we used this drug in various types of syphilitic infection of the central nervous system. Our intensive administration of tryparsamide occurred in the summer months, after which we

×