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January 1926

TRICHINOSIS ENCEPHALITIS: A PATHOLOGIC STUDY

Author Affiliations

Associate Professor of Neurology, College of Medicine, University of Illinois; Histologist to Illinois State Psychopathic Institute; Assistant Professor of Neurology, College of Medicine, University of Illinois CHICAGO

From the pathologic laboratories of the Research and Educational Hospitals of the University of Illinois and the State Psychopathic Institute.

Arch NeurPsych. 1926;15(1):34-47. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1926.02200190037003
Abstract

Notwithstanding the exceedingly rich literature on trichinosis, few contributions treat of the neurologic or neuropathologic phase of this infection, and practically none deals with the changes that result from the presence of Trichinae in the brain tissues. Only Frothingham,1 who succeeded in demonstrating these worms in the brain, gives a superficial description of the concomitant changes. These were rather meager—"slight hemorrhages without cellular reaction and areas of cellular infiltrations consisting chiefly of endothelial and neuroglia cells with an occasional leukocyte and lymphocyte. In such an area part of a trichina embryo sometimes appears outside the vessels."

The case here recorded is thus the second in the literature in which the invasion of the brain by Trichina larvae has been demonstrated together with its effect on the central nervous system.

REPORT OF A CASE 

History.  —A boy, aged 14, admitted Nov. 30, 1924, to the medical service (Dr. Weatherson)

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