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February 1926

BEHAVIOR ORIGINS FROM A PHYSIOLOGIC POINT OF VIEW

Arch NeurPsych. 1926;15(2):173-184. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1926.02200200024002
Abstract

The term "behavior" when applied to living organisms is commonly employed to denote excitomotor behavior. Actually, however, as Jennings has pointed out, the excitomotor reactions are only a part of the behavior of organisms. Behavior may be defined as reaction to conditions external to the reacting system, and as such reaction it is not peculiar to living persons, but is characteristic of all things.

It is unnecessary to enlarge here on the fact that there are always two factors or groups of factors, the external and the internal, concerned in the behavior of anything, living or non-living. The reaction is always a resultant, on the one hand, of the constitution of the reacting system, and, on the other, of the condition to which the system reacts. Organisms arise from other organisms by various processes of reproduction and development, and through these processes continuity of life and in the main of

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