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March 1926

DIFFICULT URINATION ASSOCIATED WITH INTRACRANIAL TUMORS OF THE POSTERIOR FOSSAA PHYSIOLOGIC AND CLINICAL STUDY

Arch NeurPsych. 1926;15(3):371-380. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1926.02200210092009
Abstract

Disturbances in the act of urination in the conscious, rational person are a frequent accompaniment of spinal cord disease, and in most instances are attributed to pathologic alterations in the lumbar and sacral regions involving the lower cord "center" for micturition. The retention of urine which accompanies upper spinal cord tumors suggests, however, that these urinary difficulties may be due to some interference with the passing of impulses from a higher center, and additional evidence in support of this view is obtained from a study of similar urinary disturbances associated with intracranial tumors located in the posterior fossa. In these cases there is no question of a lower cord lesion.

Normal micturition is said to be accomplished through the coordination of two complementary nerve-control mechanisms through the hypogastric nerves and the nervi erigentes.1 The upper four lumbar nerves send white rami communicantes to the lateral chain of the sympathetic

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