[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other
November 1926

LEMNISCUS SYMPTOMS FOLLOWING EPIDEMIC ENCEPHALITIS: BILATERAL IMPAIRMENT OF DEEP SENSATION

Arch NeurPsych. 1926;16(5):605-612. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1926.02200290068005
Abstract

In 1908, Spiller published an article1 in which he referred to another2 previously published by him on the symptom-complex produced by occlusion of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. He pointed out that the lesion was always unilateral and that the lateral portion of the medulla oblongata was involved, whereas the central and anterior parts were not affected, since this area was supplied by a different set of vessels, the anterior spinal arteries and their branches. He suggested, therefore, that if only the anterior spinal arteries were occluded or hemorrhage occurred from them, a very definite symptom-complex should be expected to develop, the complement of that caused by occlusion of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. He says:

The anterior spinal arteries arise from the vertebrals about a centimeter before the latter unite to form the basilar. The left anterior spinal artery is frequently the larger, and, according to

×