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April 1927

METASTATIC MENINGO-ENCEPHALIC CARCINOMATOSIS WITHOUT TUMEFACTION

Arch NeurPsych. 1927;17(4):466-470. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1927.02200340042003
Abstract

The ordinary conception of cerebral neoplasm, whether primary or secondary, intramedullary or extramedullary, is that of a definite nodule or infiltrating mass. The expressions diffuse carcinomatosis or sarcomatosis are employed to convey the idea of extent, but there is not a suitable terminology to connote neoplasia without tumefaction. An instance of this was encountered in the course of routine examinations of neuro-pathologic material, and it is reported because the pathologic features are at variance with the usual concept of tumor of the brain.

REPORT OF CASE 

History.  —A man aged 30, was admitted to the New York City Hospital on Jan. 6, 1924, complaining of headache, backache, insomnia, and nausea without vomiting, which had existed for three weeks.The physical examination revealed bilateral papilledema with 7 diopters swelling of the disk; inflammatory changes were not present in the fundus. The patellar reflexes were absent, and the abdominal reflexes were

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