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June 1928

EVOLUTION AND THE DARWINIAN THEORY OF HUMAN DESCENTVIEWED FROM THE STANDPOINT OF A MULTIPLE PRIMATE ANCESTRY

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

Arch NeurPsych. 1928;19(6):969-980. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1928.02210120002001
Abstract

The Philadelphia Neurological Society was organized late in 1884. In the early years of the society, especially in the lustrum from 1885 to 1890, much attention was given in its proceedings to the morphology, anatomy and physiology of the brain. The reason for this is to be sought in a knowledge of the character and scientific tendencies of some of the early members, among whom I may refer to, Andrew J. Parker, Francis X. Dercum, Harrison Allen, James Hendrie Lloyd, William Osler and perhaps myself.

Parker and Dercum at times pursued investigations in the laboratory of that great biologist, Joseph Leidy. In Leidy's laboratory, with Parker, I joined in some researches on the circulation of the brain and on the surface morphology of Chinese, negro and aberrant Caucasian brains.

Leidy was an early disciple of Darwin, with whom he not infrequently corresponded. Influenced by the example of Leidy and our

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