[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other
June 1928

NEURINOMA: A CASE OF INVOLVEMENT OF THE CAUDA EQUINA WITH THE CLINICAL PICTURE OF BILATERAL SCIATICA

Author Affiliations

Professor of Neurology, College of Medicine, University of Illinois; Histologist to the Illinois State Psychopathic Institute CHICAGO

From the Neurologic Service of Cook County Hospital and the pathologic laboratories of the State Psychopathic Institute and the Research Hospital of the University of Illinois.

Arch NeurPsych. 1928;19(6):1087-1100. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1928.02210120120009
Abstract

A neurinoma originates in the embryonic cells of Schwann, or, as some put it, in the precursors of these cell elements. Antoni1 calls them lemmoblasts. Described mainly in the posterior roots of the spinal cord, neurinomas also occur in: the pharynx and bronchi (Askanazy2); the gastro-intestinal canal (Orzechowski and Nowicki,3 Banerjee and Christeller4); the cerebral nerves, including the optic (Reverdin and Grumbach5) but especially in the acoustic, and even in the central nervous system—the brain (Josephy6) and spinal cord (Kirch7). This type of tumor is not rare, for Antoni found it in twenty of thirty cases of tumors of the spinal cord that he studied, while Sommer8 gave an account of thirty-seven and Erb9 of ten additional cases; to these may be added eight cases studied by Borchardt.10 In all, fifty-five cases of neurinomas have been recorded.

In former years

×