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October 1928

OPTIC NYSTAGMUSTECHNICAL INTRODUCTION, WITH OBSERVATIONS IN A CASE WITH CENTRAL SCOTOMA IN THE RIGHT EYE AND EXTERNAL RECTUS PALSY IN THE LEFT EYE

Author Affiliations

Professor of Psychology; Assistant Professor of Medicine NEW HAVEN, CONN.

From the Institute of Psychology and the School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University, and the Medical Service of the New Haven Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1928;20(4):812-823. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1928.02210160153013
Abstract

Although the ocular nystagmus resulting from watching moving objects has been recognized for many years, it has not received the scientific attention comparable to the intensive investigation, both clinical and experimental, that has been accorded the nystagmus evoked by labyrinthine stimulation. Dodge1 described photographic records of the eye movements evoked by a group of moving objects in 1903, and by a moving pendulum2 in 1907. The latter type of visual stimulus was subsequently utilized by Diefendorf and Dodge3 in the study of the ocular reactions of patients with mental disease. Bárány4 was the first to study the nystagmus elicited by a succession of moving objects in connection with ocular palsies, soon followed by the work of Wirths.5 Coppez6 briefly described this type of eye movement in 1913, and in 1920, Bartels7 found that it occurred in reptiles and birds but stated that optical

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