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February 1929

PLURIGLANDULAR SYNDROME: INVOLVING CALCIUM DEFICIENCY AND CORRELATED WITH BEHAVIOR DISTURBANCES

Arch NeurPsych. 1929;21(2):254-260. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1929.02210200010002
Abstract

Within the past ten years many cases have come under my observation in which the chief complaints were those of incorrigibility, nonamenability to discipline, and assaultiveness; the patients were easily aroused to a high pitch of anger at the slightest provocation—a word, an insinuation or even a glance being sufficient to arouse intense antagonistic reaction. These patients became problem cases at home, at school or in whatever environment they found themselves, because of their nonadaptability and uncompromising attitude. Occasionally their behavior became so exaggerated that apparently hypomanic states developed therefrom, and several of these patients had to be confined in institutions until the symptoms were ameliorated. At home, a harsh word from any member of the family, at the table for instance, would result in a plate or knife or some other utensil being thrown at the aggressor. In school, a blow, a shout or a curse would be hurled

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