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February 1929

INTRA-UTERINE POLIOMYELITIS: REPORT OF A CASE IN WHICH A RECRUDESCENCE OF SYMPTOMS OCCURRED AFTER FIFTY YEARS

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Departments of Neurology and Neuropathology of the Philadelphia General Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1929;21(2):288-298. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1929.02210200044005
Abstract

The transmission of various infectious diseases, such as variola, erysipelas, diphtheria and tuberculosis, from the mother to the fetus in utero has been reported a number of times. That epidemic encephalitis can be so transmitted seems probable. Achard and Netter1 cited two cases in which the mothers had the disease. One child was markedly somnolent and had retention of urine for several days after birth; the other had myoclonia and hemorrhagic papules. The authors concluded by stating that "in encephalitis, as in other maternal infections, the fetus may be infected through the placenta but this does not invariably occur." Mercier, Andrieux and Bonnaud2 reported the case of a woman who contracted the disease in the eighth month of pregnancy and died from it eighteen days after delivery. Two weeks after birth, the child developed myoclonic movements of the head and arms, retraction of the head, stiffening of the

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