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March 1929

ACUTE ASCENDING MYELOMALACIAWITH THE CLINICAL PICTURE OF LANDRY'S PARALYSIS: CLINICOPATHOLOGIC REPORT OF A CASE

Arch NeurPsych. 1929;21(3):594-606. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1929.02210210120007
Abstract

The original description of acute ascending paralysis was given by Landry1 in 1859. A motor paralysis beginning in the legs extends rapidly to the arms and, within a few days, to the bulbar nerves. As additional features Landry noted the relative inconspicuousness of the sensory symptoms, the absence of sphincter disturbances and the complete lack of microscopic evidence in the spinal cord. However, with increasing experience and improvement in technic, cases were observed which necessitated a broadening of the original definition as to both the clinical and the pathologic features.

In the cases of Wappenschmidt,2 Nauwerck and Barth,3 Marie and Trétiakoff,4 Bostroem5 and Marinesco and Oettinger,6 sensory and sphincter disturbances were more or less pronounced, and definite histologic changes were found. In the cases of Wappenschmidt and of Nauwerck and Barth, the condition resembled that of multiple neuritis. In Marie and Trétiakoff's case a

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