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June 1929

INTRASPINAL IODOLOGRAPHY: SUBARACHNOID INJECTION OF IODIZED OIL AS AN AID IN THE DETECTION AND LOCALIZATION OF LESIONS COMPRESSING THE SPINAL CORD

Author Affiliations
NEW YORK
From the Neurologic Service and Radiologic Department, of Mount Sinai Hospital.
Arch NeurPsych. 1929;21(6):1331-1386. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1929.02210240106008
Abstract

The introduction of iodized oil 40 per cent into the intraspinal subarachnoid space by means of cisternal puncture, for roentgenologic visualization of the patent or locally obstructed subarachnoid space in patients revealing signs and symptoms of compression of the spinal cord, was introduced by Sicard1 eight years ago. The method has won a prominent place in neurologic clinics abroad, where it is now almost a routine diagnostic procedure employed whenever an intraspinal neoplasm is suspected. Neurologists and neurosurgeons2 in this country, however, with few exceptions, have not adopted the method, maintaining that it is an unnecessary and undesirable procedure, which offers no advantage over older neurologic methods and tests. It is further argued by them that: (1) as another mechanical diagnostic aid, it menaces the development of an acute clinical sense; (2) the iodized oil is an irritant and as such may lead to undesirable meningeal complications; (3)

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