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September 1929

THE RELATION OF THE CERVICAL SYMPATHETIC TRUNK TO CEREBRAL ANGIOSPASM

Arch NeurPsych. 1929;22(3):570-574. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1929.02220030147014
Abstract

The opinion that nervous control of the cerebral vasculature was either nonexistent or undemonstrable has long obtained. Although experimental confirmation was lacking, anatomic observations have for years demonstrated the nervous architecture distributed throughout the cerebral vessels. Gulland,1 although unable to show nerve fibers in his original investigation in conjunction with Bayliss and Hill,2 was thereafter able to demonstrate their presence.3 Obersteiner4 and others5 were among the earlier investigators employing metallic impregnations in their preparations, and although highly suggestive, these were not viewed as conclusive even from a morphologic point of view. Stöhr,6 employing a modified Bielschowsky technic, succeeded in demonstrating nervous elements and nerve endings in the pial vascular architecture. It remained, therefore, for Forbes and Wolff7 to substantiate by accurate photometric methods the observation originally put forth by Donders8 that faradization of the cervical sympathetic trunk causes constriction of the cerebral

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