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December 1929

POSTURE WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE CEREBELLUM

Author Affiliations

VIENNA, AUSTRIA

Arch NeurPsych. 1929;22(6):1116-1126. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1929.02220060013002
Abstract

EVIDENCES OF DECEREBRATE RIGIDITY IN ANIMAL AND IN MAN  The description of decerebrate rigidity by Sherrington was an important event in neurology. Sherrington observed, in 1896, after a transsection through the midbrain between the anterior and the posterior corpora quadrigemina, an increased tonus of the extensor muscles of the neck, the back, the tail and the legs. All the muscles that secured the erect position of the animal were overinnervated. It is the function of standing which appears in such a way. Richter1 has shown that in the sloth, an animal in which the normal attitude is that of hanging from trees with flexed limbs, decerebrate rigidity is a flexor rigidity. The muscular tension in connection with decerebrate rigidity is a special one. Sherrington discovered the shortening and lengthening reaction of muscle: The muscle adapts itself to any length given to it without change in tension. Sherrington and Lidell

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