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December 1929

THE RÔLE OF INFECTION IN THE ETIOLOGY OF TICS

Author Affiliations

PORTLAND, ORE.

From the Department of Medicine, University of Oregon Medical School.

Arch NeurPsych. 1929;22(6):1163-1171. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1929.02220060060005
Abstract

Until recently, the problem of tic has been considered settled. Following the lines laid down by Charcot and Brissaud, Meige and Feindel, in 1905, published the results of their comprehensive studies under the title "Tics and their Treatment." According to them, the tic is of psychogenic origin. The fundamental basis on which it develops is a psychopathic personality. The essential element in that personality is volitional weakness. What begins as an expression movement, or a defense movement, or an irritation movement, by frequent repetition becomes automatized. Then, because of the volitional weakness, the automatized movement gets out of control and becomes exaggerated and deformed, a caricature of its former self.

The views expressed by Meige and Feindel were generally accepted for a number of years. They were in line with the prevailing views regarding the etiology of the group of disorders which are now known as the motility disorders. With

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