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April 1930

TUMOR OF THE BRAIN WITH SUDDEN ONSET OF SYMPTOMS: A REPORT OF TEN CASES AND REVIEW OF SIMILAR REPORTS

Arch NeurPsych. 1930;23(4):727-741. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1930.02220100111006
Abstract

For years it has been recognized that glial tumors vary in histologic structure. Of this heterogeneous group, Strauss and Globus called attention to one type first called spongioblastoma and later spongioblastoma multiforme. In their report1 in 1918, they stressed the frequently sudden onset of symptoms, the unusually rapid progress and the fatal termination and reviewed the past varying conceptions of the histology and derivation of brain tumors. The histologic features were summarized as: (1) the neuro-epithelial character of the dominating type of cells; (2) the presence of well defined spongioblasts and ependyma cells; (3) the syncytial structure alternating with reticular interlacement of cell processes, and (4) the marked proliferative tendencies.

Clinically, this type of case offers much difficulty in diagnosis with the sudden onset, variable symptomatology and rapid progress, as evidenced in a number of cases here reported and reviewed, in some of which, particularly, the rapidity of the

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