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July 1930

LILLIPUTIAN HALLUCINATIONS FOLLOWING THE USE OF CAFFEINE CITRATE

Author Affiliations

Denver

Instructor in Neurology, University of Colorado School of Medicine; Attending Physician (Neurologist), Children's Hospital

Arch NeurPsych. 1930;24(1):143-146. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1930.02220130146013
Abstract

In his essay on Lilliputian hallucinations,1 Leroy cited a considerable number of French references to this condition, but the English and American literature is singularly deficient in similar observations, though the syndrome must be of frequent occurrence. Vonderahe2 recently reported it in a case of acute hyoscine poisoning.

Leroy, who apparently first designated the syndrome "Lilliputian," defines it as... "the vision of small people, men and women of minute or slightly variable size either above or accompanied by small animals or small objects proportionate in size. These hallucinations are motile, colored, generally multiple.... These microscopic visions give an impression of real life."1 It should be remembered that these small figures operate in an environment, of normal size, and they are not to be confused with a true micropsia. As in other visual hallucinations, there is seldom associated aural hallucinosis, but if it should exist, the figures speak

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