[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other
October 1930

INFLUENCE OF INTERCURRENT FEBRILE DISORDERS ON PREEXISTING EPILEPSY

Arch NeurPsych. 1930;24(4):753-758. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1930.02220160089009
Abstract

Improvement in cases of epilepsy during and following acute infectious diseases has been reported in many individual cases. The relatively small number reported by any one observer has led me to review 200 cases of epilepsy in patients of all ages in which records of convulsions had been kept for several months previous to, and for a similar time after, some acute febrile disorder.

The diseases of childhood have been credited with many cures of epilepsy, but such cures may have been coincidental recoveries. There are two periods of life wherein the greatest number of cases of epilepsy develop;1 namely, the first four years of life, and at puberty. Singularly, these are also the periods of life during which most cures of epilepsy are reported. There are logical explanations of these recoveries which are entirely independent of any intercurrent disease. During these periods the most marked physiologic changes occur,

×