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October 1930

PECULIARITIES OF BEHAVIOR: WANDERING MANIA, KLEPTOMANIA, DIPSOMANIA, PYROMANIA AND ALLIED IMPULSIVE ACTS: A REVIEW OF THE BOOK BY WILHELM STEKEL

Arch NeurPsych. 1930;24(4):787-808. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1930.02220160123015
Abstract

In the psychoanalytic world Stekel occupies a peculiar position. One knows well why others have dissented and wherein their stand differs from the orthodox; not so with Stekel. Adler left the camp because the concept of inferiority began to dominate his view on neuroses to the exclusion or subordination of any other; he was not willing to wait until Freud would provide in his system a place for his concept. When Freud was still searching for the ramifications of infantile sexuality, Jung was demanding with an ever-increasing insistence that due recognition be given to the higher, more cultural and more sublime aspects of the human personality; unwilling to wait for Freud to meet the demands, he left and developed a school of his own. And when Rank, outfreuding Freud, left, there were also numerous theoretical and practical differences. But in the instance of Stekel the differences were mainly personal; the

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