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December 1930

MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS AND CEREBELLOPONTILE ANGLE TUMOR: DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA; BUFFALO

From Temple University Medical School, University of Buffalo Medical School and the Laboratory of Neuropathology, Philadelphia General Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1930;24(6):1206-1216. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1930.02220180103008
Abstract

In 1920, our attention was directed to this subject by the postmortem observations in the case of a patient, aged 45, in which a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis had been made. This patient had been examined by competent observers, who had found bilateral nystagmus, marked speech defect, cerebellar incoordination, more marked on one side than the other, and general hyperreflexia. In particular there were no symptoms of a tumor of the brain, such as headache and vomiting, and examination of the eyegrounds gave no indication of any increase of intracranial pressure. The deafness was thought to be accounted for by an old disease of the middle ear. To the surprise of all concerned, at autopsy a cerebellopontile angle tumor was disclosed. Since, we have been on the alert for cases of this sort, and four cases of this type have come under our observation; in three an operation has been

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