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May 1931

PHYSIOLOGIC DIFFERENCES BETWEEN GENERIC AND INDIVIDUALLY ACQUIRED AUTOMATIC ASSOCIATED MOVEMENTS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Neurological Institute of New York and the City Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1931;25(5):998-1002. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1931.02230050074003
Abstract

It is not our purpose to enter a disputatious field. We shall not, at the moment, concern ourselves with the essential nature of volition, motion or any other contemporarily insoluble issue. While the basic character and even the existence of the so-called automatic associated movements are admittedly in dispute, we believe that a working definition of them can be given.

By associated movements we mean those resulting from the combined action of different groups of muscles producing simultaneous and related motion of two or more well separated parts of the body, such as the two arms. Prime examples are the normal swinging of the arms, which is a part of walking, and the motions of one leg as related to those of the other in walking. Such phenomena as the extension of the wrist during grasping do not fall definitely into the group we are considering. In our use of

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