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July 1931

EFFECTS OF FRAGMENTARY AND COMPLETE EXTIRPATION OF THE CEREBELLUM IN THE CATA PRELIMINARY REPORT ON CEREBELLAR LOCALIZATION

Arch NeurPsych. 1931;26(1):1-22. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1931.02230070007001
Abstract

It is well known that while a number of authors oppose the conception of definite localization in the cerebellum, others still believe that such localization exists, and that definite centers are present for the regulation of the finest movements of the eyes, head, neck, trunk, legs, etc. This controversy has again come to the foreground since the recent revival of the work of Horsley and Clarke by Aubrey Mussen, who, by means of electrical stimulation, has reached the conclusion that well localized centers are to be recognized in the cerebellum, while Riley, from a study of comparative anatomy, has reached an essentially opposite opinion.

Our approach to this complex problem has been by means of extirpation of different parts of the cerebellum as well as of the whole organ and by studying the resulting impairment of functions. Other authors, for example, Luciani, Ferrier, Thomas, van Rijnberk, Rothman, Rossi and Rademaker,

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