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September 1931

THE OCCASIONAL FULMINATING COURSE OF ENCEPHALITIS EPIDEMICA

Author Affiliations

Madison, Wis.

From the Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin.

Arch NeurPsych. 1931;26(3):607-609. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1931.02230090140010
Abstract

The conspicuous and distressing sequelae of encephalitis epidemica have led to the growing belief in its protracted course. The frequency with which the initial invasion is overlooked and the true status of affairs recognized only by the so-called postencephalitic manifestations, has contributed still further to this professional judgment. Yet cases of a fulminating character do occur and must be evaluated before a comprehensive idea of the course of encephalitis can be gained. Hence the following case is reported.

REPORT OF CASE 

History.  —R. S., a white woman, aged 20, was admitted to the University Infirmary on Jan. 29, 1924, with the complaints of sore throat and headache. These conditions had existed in some degree for three days, but there had been no incapacity for ordinary duties. On the morning of admission the general malaise had first become troublesome and the throat was decidedly worse. The past medical history was irrelevant,

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