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December 1931

THE EFFECT OF REMOVAL OF THE STELLATE GANGLIA ON WORMWOOD OIL CONVULSIONS IN CATS

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, N. Y.

From the Department of Anatomy, the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry.

Arch NeurPsych. 1931;26(6):1226-1233. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1931.02230120109006
Abstract

The observation that the exposed brains of epileptic patients under operation have been seen to blanch just before the onset of a convulsion and the recent establishment of the vasomotor control of the cerebral blood vessels have stimulated the investigation of angiospasm as related to the epileptic fit.

Kennedy1 observed blanching of the parietal cortex before the onset of an attack in a human subject. Foerster2 described a sequence of events repeatedly seen by him, in epileptic patients, at the operating table: first, the brain becomes pale and sinks away from the skull; then it is suffused with blood and bulges greatly as the convulsion starts.

That the cerebral vessels are under nervous control is generally accepted today, although for many years it was thought that vasomotor nerves were absent in the pial vessels and that the cerebral circulation passively followed the general arterial and venous pressures. The

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