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January 1932

THE EPILEPTIC CONVULSIONS OF DEMENTIA PARALYTICA: THEIR RELATION TO SCLEROSIS OF THE CORNU AMMONIS

Author Affiliations

Fellow of the National Research Council MUNICH, GERMANY

From the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Psychiatrie (Kaiser Wilhelm Institute).

Arch NeurPsych. 1932;27(1):138-153. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1932.02230130144008
Abstract

Considerable interest has been manifested recently in vascular spasms1 and their relation to cerebral lesions and to the convulsions of epilepsy. There have been numerous observations at operations that epileptic convulsions are accompanied by blanching of the brain,2 and recently Gildea and Cobb3 have reported convulsions in cats in which they produced anemia of the brain by tying the large vessels in the neck. It was therefore thought that if in dementia paralytica, which frequently shows epileptic convulsions as a symptom, any evidence of such vascular spasms could be found, the relation of this to the incidence of convulsions in the patients would be very significant. It was for this reason, at the suggestion of Dr. Spielmeyer, that I undertook to study the cases of dementia paralytica in the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt in Munich.

Sclerosis of the cornu ammonis was first described in 1825 by Bouchet and Cazauvieilh;

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