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April 1932

HEAD INJURIES: EFFECTS AND THEIR APPRAISAL: I. EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF INDUCED CONVULSIONS AND VENTRICULAR DISTORTION IN THE CAT

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Laboratory of Experimental Neurology, Department of Laboratories, Bellevue Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1932;27(4):776-783. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1932.02230160017002
Abstract

HISTORICAL REVIEW  The rôle of head trauma in the production of convulsive phenomena is well known. Experimentally, this problem has received much attention. Brown-Séquard, in 1851, traumatized various parts of the central nervous system in rabbits and was able to induce convulsions by means of lesions of the medulla, cord, peduncles and quadrigeminal bodies. He observed that contralateral convulsive phenomena occurred secondary to cerebral lesions. Nothnagel, in 1868, produced small focal lesions in the pons in rabbits and also was able to elicit convulsions. Subsequently, Westphal (1871) was able to produce fits in rabbits by striking them on the head. The convulsions appeared directly or within a few seconds following the trauma and in some of these animals continued for several months. Later, Luciani (1878) and Vulpian (1885) were able to obtain spontaneous epilepsy in dogs and cats by the excision of various cortical areas. Convulsions did not appear immediately

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