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June 1932

HISTOLOGIC STUDIES OF THE BRAIN IN CASES OF FATAL INJURY TO THE HEAD: IV. REACTION OF THE CLASSIC NEUROGLIA

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES

From the Neurological Service and the Neuropathological Laboratory of the Los Angeles County General Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1932;27(6):1342-1379. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1932.02230180071006
Abstract

The cerebral states following acute injuries to the brain, particularly those included under the elusive term of concussion, have long been the subject of considerable conjecture. A satisfactory physiologic and pathologic explanation for the acute or chronic clinical symptoms manifested has not been clearly established. For example, the individual nervous and mental phenomena that so frequently appear as an aftermath to brain injury have been attributed by some to generalized gliosis or to other diffuse tissue change. To the contrary, there are others who believe that such manifestations are to be explained largely on a functional basis. Is the solution of the problem to be sought in histologic studies? Can sufficient alterations be found in the various cellular elements to account for immediate as well as remote symptoms? What alterations take place in these cells, and what is their significance? In what measure can the reaction of the classic neuroglia

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