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July 1932

STUDIES IN SENSATION: III. CHEMICAL FACTOR IN THE STIMULATION OF END-ORGAN GIVING TEMPERATURE SENSATIONS

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Department of Physiology, University of Pennsylvania.

Arch NeurPsych. 1932;28(1):71-91. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1932.02240010079005
Abstract

Ebbecke1 drew attention to the temperature sensations that are induced in a limb on release of a circulatory stasis which has been maintained for some while, and subjected these sensations, and the variations in them produced by altering the external conditions, to very careful analysis. He concluded that sensations of both warmth and cold depended on thermal gradients of varying intensity set up at different depths as warm blood entered cooled skin or vice versa. Goldscheider and Hahn2 subjected Ebbecke's theories to considerable criticism; they showed that if his experiments were repeated quite different sensations, or no sensation at all, might be induced if the time intervals employed were varied. The present experiments were therefore undertaken to measure the actual temperature changes and gradients that accompanied such sensations with a view to applying a more direct test to Ebbecke's theory. In the course of these experiments it became

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