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August 1932

CALCIUM CONTENT OF THE BRAIN AND ITS DISTRIBUTION IN VARIOUS REGIONS DURING DIALLYLBARBITURIC ACID NARCOSIS: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE

From the Henry Phipps Psychiatric Clinic (Department of Internal Medicine), Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1932;28(2):405-412. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1932.02240020157012
Abstract

Previous calcium studies in sleep have led to the conclusion that hypnotic sleep provoked by diallylbarbituric acid is associated with a decrease of calcium in both blood and cerebrospinal fluid.1 This experimental investigation is concerned with the calcium content of the brain and also specifically with the distribution of calcium in certain areas of the brain in a series of animals killed during sleep and in another series killed in the waking state.

Calcium has been chosen as the subject of study in preference to other blood constituents on account of the investigations referring to its pharmacodynamic effect on the brain and to the particular rôle it is alleged to play in sleep. Pharmacologic studies, among which those concerned with calcium are preeminent, have contributed greatly to the much debated problem as to whether sleep is regulated by specific sleep centers. The common character of these pharmacologic contributions lies

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