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September 1932

RELATION OF THE CEREBRUM TO THE CEREBELLUMI. CEREBELLAR TREMOR IN THE CAT AND ITS ABSENCE AFTER REMOVAL OF THE CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.; OXFORD, ENGLAND; BOSTON

From the Laboratories of Physiology, Oxford, England, and the Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn.

Arch NeurPsych. 1932;28(3):542-570. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1932.02240030062003
Abstract

The present paper and those that follow in this series embody the results of a systematic attempt to study the consequences of removal of related portions of the cerebellum and cerebral hemispheres in a large series of mammals, including monkeys and the higher apes. The basis of the investigation is the familiar fact that the neocerebellum has developed in evolutionary history pari passu with the growth of the cerebrum, which bespeaks an intimate functional association between the two1 (Rossi2).

At the beginning of our work it was thought essential to analyze the results of complete decerebellation and of complete decortication in cats, dogs and monkeys; later, we undertook to observe the effects of localized lesions of the cerebellum and cerebral hemispheres. We believe that the study has shed considerable light on some phases of the functional activity of the cerebellum, and we propose now to record them seriatim.

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