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December 1932

OXYGEN. CONSUMPTION ("BASAL METABOLIC RATE") IN SCHIZOPHRENIA: II. DISTRIBUTIONS IN TWO HUNDRED AND FOURTEEN CASES

Author Affiliations

With the Technical Assistance of Anna Walsh, R.N. BOSTON

From the Worcester State Hospital and the Memorial Foundation for Neuro-Endocrine Research.

Arch NeurPsych. 1932;28(6):1346-1364. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1932.02240060105006
Abstract

The fact that the incidence of schizophrenia correlates with both constitutional and genetic factors implies that the organic elements in the picture are of primary significance.1 This follows irrespective of the weight that one may attach to psychogenic factors. The psychosis is characterized by numerous deviations from physiologic normality. It would seem desirable, therefore, that the disorder be described in its organic aspects fully and accurately. In standard textbooks of psychiatry the conventional neglect of the organic in favor of the psychologic is striking. This is the more remarkable in that the organic features lend themselves much more readily than do the mental to accurate description. While it is true that "mere enumeration" of traits is a methodology of strictly limited significance, attempts to advance in research without an adequate description of the phenomena under study are likely to be characterized by ineptitudes.

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