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July 1933

RÔLE OF THE ANTERIOR ROOTS IN VISCERAL SENSIBILITY

Arch NeurPsych. 1933;30(1):99-106. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1933.02240130107005
Abstract

In the past twenty-five years, the anterior roots have been said by many investigators to contain antidromic fibers which conduct painful impulses from the viscera and skin. The purpose of this experimental study was to determine whether or not there are antidromic fibers in the anterior roots which serve to transmit sensations.

Interest in the presence of sensory fibers in the anterior spinal roots dates from the days of Magendie,1 Claude Bernard,2 Walker,1 Lamarch1 and Bell.3 After many experiments, Claude Bernard succeeded in showing that sensation was present in the anterior roots, which he concluded to be due to the presence of recurrent sensory fibers passing from the posterior ganglia up the anterior roots to supply the spinal meninges. His experimental work consisted of laminectomies performed on dogs. It was found that if an anterior root was severed, stimulation of the peripheral stump alone gave

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